Category Archives: Abstract

Antarctica FridayFoto #9

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Bubbles from the divers tanks flow like quicksilver on the underside of the frozen sea at Cape Evans, Antarctica. We were lucky enough to spend three days camping on the sea-ice with Dr Ian Hawkes and his fellow scientists as they dived below the two metre thick ice.

Antarctica FridayFoto #8

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A diptych of images showing a detail of snow piled high on the windows of Scott’s historic hut at Cape Evans. When we visited in October the interior of the Hutt was very dark because the sun was still low and this snow on the windowed blocked it’s light. This created a very moody experience as we explored by the light of headlamps.

Antarctica FridayFoto #1

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Following on from a conversation with Warren in which he asked me to send him a new photo from our Antarctica #60shadesofwhite project every Friday I have decided to declare the beginning of  “Antarctica FridayFoto” – I’ll post a random image every Friday … what fun!

To kick things off I thought I would transport you to the disorientingly beautiful world under the sea-ice in McMurdo Sound. Taken from the observation tube in front of the American base, both images (yes one is upside-down) show the algae growing on the underside of the 2m thick ice.

Kermadec exhibition opens in Wgtn today

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In celebration of the government’s announced intention to create the Kermadec Marine Sanctuary (only the 4th biggest in the world!) the Kermadec artists have put together a ‘final’ exhibition here in Wellington.

Hosted by Pataka, the show is on at the Academy Gallery on Queens Wharf from today

All the original artists (Phil Dadson, Bruce Foster, Fiona Hall, Gregory O’Brien, John Pule, John Reynolds. Elizabeth Thomson, Robin White and me of course) are represented, most with new works. I have new photographic works and a video instillation.

I would also highly recommend coming to one of the shows put on the the theatre group Company of Giants, who will be performing Rangitahua from the 15th until the 19th (2pm and 7pm). Book at iticket.co.nz. It is a great show that weaves it’s way among the audience and exhibition telling the story of the Kermadecs.

More on the Kermedac project

Seismic: 1&2

Yesterday we hung my latest works in the Kermadec: Discoveries and Connections exhibition which opens in Wellington this weekend.

Seismic 1&2 are large scale photographic prints onto Aluminium Composite Material (ACM). It’s the first time I have used this technique and Imagelab has done a great job of printing them.

As with previous explorations recently, they are inspired by a map I was given by The Pew Charitable Trust showing the migratory routes of whales through the Kermadec region and the geography created by the collision between the Pacific and Australian Plates.

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I imaged what mapping millions of years of migrations and geologic activity might look like and experimented extreme close up shots of bubbles moving through water taken with a long shutter speed to create the appearance of intertwined fibres. To create twisting paths and add drama and depth to the compositions I pushed the bubbles with mirrors.

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I tested printing onto raw aluminium, which added a nice sheen but at the expense of image detail, so went with a matte white ACM for the final prints.

Nothing beats seeing the detail of a large print in real life so make sure to come to the show in Wellington if you can!

Kermadec: Discoveries and Connections is on 9 – 20 April at the Academy Galleries, Queens Wharf, Wellington. In partnership with Pataka. It features  works by Phil Dadson, Bruce Foster, Fiona Hall, Gregory O’Brien, John Pule, John Reynolds. Elizabeth Thomson, Robin White and I.

These prints are an edition of two. $1500 NZD each

I will post photos of the works in situ after the exhibition opens.

 

Seismic migrations

My explorations into photographing bubbles moving through water continue. This time introducing a mirror and other objects into the composition to disrupt the bubble trails and dramatically increase the graphic composition.

These are an evolution from other works inspired by scientific maps of the Kermadec region showing migration routes, seismic tracings and geographic contours.

These are very high resolution images with beautiful detail when seen large. This week I will be exploring printing these very large onto aluminium sheets.